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Frankfurt first German city where Germans are a minority

More than half of the residents in Frankfurt now have a migrant background, according to official data from the city’s Office of Statistics and Elections. The figures were revealed in a 200-page document titled 'Frankfurt Integration and Diversity Monitoring'.

Published: July 1, 2017, 11:25 am

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    The report was designed to improve the growing inequalities in employment, education and housing. Some 51.2 per cent of people living in Frankfurt have a migrant background, the city’s secretary of integration Sylvia Weber said: “We have minorities with relatively large numbers in Frankfurt but no group with a clear majority.”

    Turkish migrants are the largest non-German minority who have settled down in Frankfurt, accounting for 13 per cent of the population.

    Single motherhood amongst women of foreign origin, was significantly higher than that of native Germans, Weber noted and was “a possible sign that female migrants are emancipating themselves”. She has called for extended research into the subject.

    Regarding employment rates, 78 per cent of German women work, but only 59 per cent of foreigners are employed, respectively, Breitbart reported.

    Due to the massive influx of migrants, many school children speak German badly, or not at all, and there are not enough teachers to meet the demand. In Griesheim, part of Frankfurt, foreign children for example make up 40 percent of the numbers attending school.

    Heike Lehr, primary school teacher, and 74 other primary school teachers wrote an open letter to the Hessen Culture Ministry: “Of 25 children in one classroom, often up to 80 percent lack knowledge of German, are special needs children and now also heavily traumatised refugee children.” For teachers this situation has become almost impossible to manage.

    The manager of the school district office in Frankfurt told ZDF TV: “The refugee situation exhausted our stock of applicants.”

    Economically, the report shows huge gaps between foreigners and Germans, with the income of 49 per cent of foreigners living below the poverty line compared to only 23 per cent of Germans.

    The authors of Super-Diversity: A New Perspective on Integration said newcomers should not assimilate, because it would kill “diversity” they argued. “If there is no longer an ethnic majority group, everyone will have to adapt to everyone else. Diversity will become the new norm.”

    The book published last year, predicted that native Germans would soon be reduced to a minority in Frankfurt, Augsburg, and Stuttgart — joining other “majority minority” cities in Europe which include Amsterdam, London, Brussels, and Geneva. The authors praised the demographic transformations as providing greater opportunities for “social justice”. Currently two-thirds of young people in many of Western Europe’s major cities are of foreign origin.

    Jens Schneider and his co-authors Maurice Crul and Frans Lelie admit “this will require one of the largest psychological shifts of our time”, while claiming that “soon, everyone living in a large European city will belong to an ethnic minority group, just as they do in New York”, a city they describe as a “vibrant metropolitan melting pot”. But New York is seeing as many as 300 000 fewer tourists in 2017 compared to last year because its “diversity” is no longer very attractive to visitors.

    The last and worst rankings of the Global Gender Gap Index of the World Economic Forum, from 128th to 144th, are without exception overwhelmingly Muslim countries, including Turkey in slot number 130.

    A 2016 study by Turkey’s Family and Social Policies Ministry revealed that no fewer than 86 percent of Turkish women have suffered physical or psychological violence at the hands of their partners or family.

    Turkey’s gender inequality has worsened since 2002, when President – then Prime Minister – Recep Tayyip Erdogan came to power. The 17th biggest economy in the world, is the 15th-last country in terms of gender equality, rubbishing claims that poverty contribute to gender inequality.

    The United Nations Population Fund observed in a report: “… women and girls are still exposed to violence, being abused, trafficked, their access to education and political participation is refused and face with many other human rights violations … The fact of violence against women as a concept emerged through gender inequality is widespread in Turkey”.

    A 2013 Hurriyet Daily News survey found that 34 percent of Turkish men think violence against women is “occasionally necessary,” while 28 percent say violence can be used to discipline women; a combined 62 percent approval of violence against women.

    At the beginning of Ramadan, a Turkish professor of theology, Cevat Aksit, said during a television show that: “Women who are not fasting due to menstruation and eat on the street during Ramadan can get beaten”.

    Bursa, one of Turkey’s biggest cities, recently launched a project to designate separate railway carriages for women. President Erdogan even once remarked that “women should know their place,” and that “gender equality is against human nature”, and his deputy prime minister told women not to laugh in public.

    In 2008, according to the federal government’s integration report, 13.3 percent of immigrant children aged 15 to 19 left school without any kind of qualification. That was twice the rate of German youths. Worryingly, the immigrant drop-out rate actually rose compared with 2007, when it was 10 percent.

    Some 43 percent of immigrant children graduate with only a Hauptschule certificate, the lowest type of secondary qualification, compared with 31 percent of German children.

    More alarmingly, just one in 10 immigrant children graduate from an elite, university-orientated secondary school, known in German as a Gymnasium, compared with one third of German children, according to a report from social research group the Paritätische Wohlfahrtsverband.

    Daniel Faas a German sociology lecturer currently based at Trinity College, Dublin, told The Local, that parents who came to Germany as unskilled workers from poor areas of Anatolya in Turkey may have low education expectations of their children. By contrast, Chinese parents put very high demands on their children, who accordingly do very well.

    “I’m not such a fan of those generation arguments – saying ‘Let’s just wait and over time … the generations will remove all these things,’” Faas said. “If anything, the third generation is actually worse again than the second.”

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