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Martin Schulz (Ralf Roletschek, Wikipedia); Angela Merkel (Casa Rosada, Wikipedia)

Merkel to face SPD demands as hysteria grips anti-AfD culture scene

Struggling German chancellor Angela Merkel is facing pressure to make unpopular concessions to the Social Democrats after the SPD party approved formal talks for a coalition.

Published: January 23, 2018, 3:20 pm

    Berlin

    Senior conservatives have however ruled out such bartering, saying that their earlier proposals for talks were non-negotiable.

    A knife-edge vote at the SPD party conference ended the political deadlock of the past four months, hinting at a break for Merkel to enter a fourth term in office. Germany has been without a government since inconclusive elections in September last year.

    The Social Democrat leadership is pushing for “improvements” to the 28-page blueprint agreed between CDU, CSU and SPD on January 12, The Financial Times reported.

    The Social Democrats are demanding more generous funding for migrants and a crackdown on temporary work contracts.

    A veritable hysteria has meanwhile seized SPD officials of the German cultural scene in view of the possibility that a member of the AfD could take over the chairmanship of the Cultural Committee of the German Bundestag.

    The “German Cultural Council” even warned against this supposedly “fatal signal”, Alice Weidel, leader of an AfD parliamentary group said. The campaign began just days after the election with an “open letter” to the council of elders of the Bundestag.

    In addition to representatives of the art business, the SPD, the Left and the Greens, the initial signatories also included politicians from the Union.

    Weidel said the campaign’s “undemocratic motive seems to be fueled by the presumptuous mistaken belief that it owns culture and is the sole representation.

    “Behind this lies the one-sided, Marxist concept of culture of the ‘Frankfurt School’, which gained the upper hand in the political-social establishment with the passage of the sixty-eight.”

    Weidel added: “In this sense, culture is not understood as the sum of human creativity and design, but as a political instrument of gaining power. The mastermind of this ‘cultural Marxism’ is the Italian Antonio Gramsci, who in the twenties of the twentieth century came up with the theory that a political seizure of power must be preceded by the attainment of ‘cultural hegemony’.

    “Discrediting the ‘bourgeois’ family, early and hypersexualisation, genderism and multiculturalism are the fruits of this cultural Marxism,” Weidel said.

    Berlin historian Jörg Baberowski recently noted, that this leftist cultural scene is protected by political correctness,

    Their own ideology is morally inflated, Baberowski explained, and those who are declared the “enemy of tolerance”, are the ones “violating the leftist hegemonic language rules”. Therefore they “should be made a non-person and excluded from the permitted discourse”.

    Weidel said the meaningless defamation vocabulary of “right-wing radical” aimed at anyone who does not want to be “left”, conveys their “fear of losing the unchallenged and unrestricted access to this instrument of domination”.

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