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German pensioner (Stock photo from Pexels)

‘Refugees’ are not paying German pensions but contributing to poverty

Germans were promised that an influx of migrants would solve the country's imploding demography. But instead pensioners are bearing the brunt of the wave of newcomers, not benefitting from it.

Published: April 24, 2018, 1:29 pm

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    “Refugees to pay our pension,” an editorial headline the newspaper Frankfurter Rundschau in February 2016 promised German readers. The migrant “influx ensures rejuvenation that is so urgently needed” and the migrants “will soon pay into our public welfare system,” the newspaper promised.

    However, poverty, especially among elderly German pensioners, has reached an historic high. Almost 20 percent of Germans are threatened by poverty today, according to the German Federal Statistical Office.

    The current level of poverty is “higher than ever since the unification of the Federal Republic and the [Communist] German Democratic Republic,” the German public broadcaster Deutsche Welle reported.

    Women, especially those who are older than 65, are more threatened by unsustainable conditions than men, according to a study commissioned by the EU.

    Poverty is reaching new heights in Germany, even as GDP continues to grow, and some economists have warned that immigration plays a central a role because it drives down wages.

    Jens Weidmann, president of the Bundesbank, told the Financial Times in January this year that the institution’s research suggests that migration “partially accounts for damped wage pressures in Germany”.

    While growing GDP might help with job creation, many of the new jobs are so poorly paid that they merely cause further erosion of middle class living standards, says Erika Biehn, deputy chairwoman of a charity set up to help the poor.

    Contrary to what the establishment media would have Germans believe, there is no evidence that the hundreds of thousands of young migrant men that have entered Germany are going to support the country’s aging work force or become productive citizens soon.

    Instead of lining up for work, these young immigrant men, in the hundreds of thousands, have taken refuge in the Germany’s generous welfare system instead.

    Municipalities have already warned against the failure of the integration of migrants into the labor market.

    Almost 600 000 migrants were eligible for work while they were receiving basic security Hartz IV, the social security pay-out, in mid-2017, said the chief executive of the city and local government, Gerd Landsberg.

    Landsberg told the newspapers of the Funke media group that this was an increase of more than 250 000 people compared to 2016.

    The chief executive of the city and community federation demanded more flexibility and cited Denmark as an example. “There, refugees are introduced to the labour market as quickly as possible, and language acquisition takes place in parallel,” he said. “Germany has to say goodbye to the rigid patterns and react to new challenges with new concepts.” Language acquisition works best in conjunction with work, he said.

    The chief executive also called on the economic players to become more involved. The qualification and training of the newly arrived to Germany was also in their interest.

    Especially from the big companies he expected “a considerable increase in effort and commitment in the field of labor market integration” to prevent a crisis. For example, local alliances could be formed for work, bringing together municipalities, chambers of commerce, businesses, the regional economy and training institutions, he explained.

    “More than half of the able-bodied unemployment benefit receivers at present are of foreign descent,” Der Spiegel reported on April 10, 2018. “According to latest numbers complied in September 2017, out of 4.3 million able-bodied welfare recipients, 55.2 percent were of an immigrant background. In 2013, that figure was 43 percent.”

    As of December 2017, an estimated 600 000 able-bodied asylum seekers in Germany were receiving state benefits, the newspaper Die Welt reported in December, 2017. Thus, the number of foreigners living on unemployment benefits has crossed the 2-million-mark focus.de reported, for the first time in post-war Germany.

    The newcomers are a strain on Germany’s finances, and since their arrival, there has been a surge across the country in violent crime. A recent report commissioned by the German Ministry of Family Affairs found that North African migrants have contributed to an increase of more than 90 percent of violent crimes in the northern state of Lower Saxony.

    Sadly, similar trends can be witnessed throughout Germany.  The investigative team led by criminal scientist Christian Pfeiffer has analyzed the situation in Lower Saxony and says the results could easily be applied to the whole country. “Lower Saxony is an average state, the results are therefore applicable in a wider sense.”

    According to the country’s annual crime report of 2017, compiled by the Federal Crime Bureau (BKA), a 50 percent rise in year-on-year rise migrant crimes was noted.

    Presently the migrants make up less than 2 percent of the German population, but was charged for nearly 15 percent of all violent crimes, such as rapes and aggravated assaults, the BKA report showed.

     

     

     

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