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AfD leaders Markus Frohnmaier, Alice Weidel, Alexander Gauland. Photo supplied

AfD co-leader stirs up the budget debate with ‘hijab girls and knife-men’

When Alice Weidel, AfD politician, opened the debate on the German federal budget, the co-leader cut right through the delicate issue binding the coalition. And rightly so, because Chancellor Angela Merkel has largely avoided the domestic policy issue number one: migrants.

Published: May 17, 2018, 10:52 am

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    Berlin

    On the matter of family reunification and the deportation scandal in Ellwangen, Merkel has been completely silent. Like Helmut Kohl in the final phase of his chancellorship, she is only interested in foreign policy – nuclear agreements, US, and Europe.

    FDP leader Christian Lindner, has meanwhile warned against a threat to social order when it comes to migrant family reunification. The Minister of the Interior, the CSU leader Horst Seehofer is as quiet as Merkel, in order to preserve the coalition peace.

    The AFD parliamentary group leader Weidel said in her widely acclaimed opening address in the Bundestag: “But, I can tell you, burkas, hijab girls and knife-men and other no-goods will not secure our prosperity, economic growth and especially the welfare state.”

    She said that in terms of survivability of an efficient state, fewer children are born than Gemans that die. The Federal Government is trying to compensate for the deficit with the immigration of mostly unqualified Muslim migrants.

    She ended her speech with a quote by Czech president Milos Zeman: “This country is ruled by idiots!”

    For the “hijab girls” comment the AfD politician received a reprimand from Bundestag President Wolfgang Schäuble. Union faction leader Volker Kauder even accused Alice Weidel of “unchristianity”.

    And Siemens boss Joe Kaeser ripped into the AfD. With their nationalism Weidel is “harming the reputation of Germany”.

    Kaeser said he would rather have a “hijab girl” than a “German federation girl”, those who built up Germany with their bare hands and contributed to the economic success of companies like Siemens. The jab, Bund Deutscher Mädel, an organisation for girls under National Socialism, once more likened the AfD to Nazis.

    But the head of Siemens has not opened his Dax company for “hijab girls” in the workplace. Just over 800 “refugees” have been hired by one of the 30 Dax companies. Instead, the “hijab girls” are mostly handed short-term internships.

    It is clear that mainstream parties are becoming extremely nervous on how to respond to the stable success of the AfD and their own losses.

    Especially in Ramadan times, Germans have the impression in their cities that the number of hijab girls has become omnipresent, PI-News reported. But these girls are not employed by the German multinational companies who welcome them.

     

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