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AfD demands investigation of migrant money transfers to home countries

The Alternative for Germany (AfD) party has requested an investigation on billions of euros transferred to families of migrants in their home countries in 2016, a German newspaper reported.

Published: July 5, 2018, 12:48 pm

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    More than 17.7 billion euros flowed from Germany back to countries of origin of migrants in 2016, which is six billion more than in 2007, according to Die Welt.

    The party says recipients of state benefits should be banned from passing on money to their home countries. ”It cannot be that development aid from the German social system is financed,” AfD spokesman Markus Frohnmaier pointed out.

    The Merkel government considers the remittances to be “development-promoting”, because the money is channeled to countries where it is needed most, Die Welt noted.

    Thousands of migrants whose asylum applications have been turned down, are currently in Germany. Faced with the inevitable, many file new applications citing new grounds, such as religious conversion and homosexuality in an attempt to delay their deportation. These efforts are also clogging up the administration.

    Finland’s Interior Ministry has meanwhile pushed to change the country’s legal system in order to stop migrants from re-applying multiple times, as is currently allowed under the law, national broadcaster Yle reported.

    As in Germany, rejected migrants often relaunch their asylum processes in order to delay imminent deportation, the Interior Ministry said. Interior Minister Kai Mykkänen said opportunities to abuse the legal system to create delays should be limited as soon as possible.

    Both the number of repeat applications and their percentage of overall applications have have increased dramatically. More than half of the repeat applicants are Iraqis, the largest group of migrants arriving in Finland during the peak of the migrant crisis.

    The proposed changes would make it easier for authorities to deport rejected asylum applications from the country if their first application failed.

    Most often, failed applicants re-apply citing their conversion to Christianity and fear of persecution as apostate of Islam. Another typical ruse includes individuals citing their sudden homosexuality, which they somehow failed to mention in the original application.

    In 2017, Finland made positive decisions on 40 percent of all asylum applicants in 2017, up from only 27 percent in 2016.

    According to Finland’s Migration Service (Migri), in 2016, mostly quick and easy applications were processed, and in 2017 did Migri by its own admission considered to more challenging applications. The number of applications that Migri dealt with in 2016 totaled 28 000, falling to 9 400 in 2017.

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