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Marine Le Pen, RN
Paris

Marine Le Pen beats Macron in latest poll

Sovereignist parties secured a combined 30 percent of support in the latest poll with Marine Le Pen’s National Rally ahead of French President Emmanuel Macron’s party for the European Parliament elections.

Published: November 5, 2018, 7:00 am

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    La Republique En Marche (LREM) is polling at only 19 percent, while the National Rally — formerly known as the National Front — is at 21 percent, Reuters reported.

    Polling agency Ifop surveyed 1000 voters, asking them how they would vote if the EU elections were held today. Macron’s ruling alliance shows that it is imploding six months ahead of the vote for European parliamentary representatives in May 2019.

    Conservative parties, including those supporting a French exit from the EU, secured a combined 30 percent of support, up from 25 percent in a similar poll in August.

    Not only is Macron’s ratings plummeting, but the globalist leader who was once portrayed as the rising star of French politics has lost his way after he managed to win with a landslide 66 percent against Le Pen’t 33 percent in the second round of the 2017 presidential election.

    The struggling Macron has meanwhile reached a tentative agreement with Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte to unite En Marche with the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe for the EP elections.

    Le Pen clearly hopes to repeat the success of the 2014 European parliamentary election, when her party gained nearly a quarter of the votes. As LREM was founded only in 2016, it did not take part in the election.

    Le Pen has denounced Macron’s immigration policies as “crazy”. She recently noted: “There is no money for the French, but there is money for migration.”

    Moreover, Christophe Barbier, political analyst confirmed in a video clip #Europeans2019 that Macron’s electoral propaganda was being financed with public money, said Le Pen. “It’s totally illegal … Macron has a problem with the campaign finance rules,” she noted.

    Le Pen has described the EU as “an ideological structure” and “an institution governed by an anonymous authority”.

    In late October an IFOP poll also revealed disappointing results of only 29 percent approval for France’s leader after a series of ministerial resignations, a violent and unvetted Moroccan bodyguard’s antics and his very lavish lifestyle.

    Also, Macron’s proposed censorship legislation – an attempt to counterattack against the success of blogs and social networks – has met with a backlash. Both Le Pen and leftist opposition leader Jean-Luc Mélenchon, slammed the proposed bill.

    Mélenchon said in response: “Emmanuel Macron chose a repressive approach and censorship only,” adding that media control was “the new obsession of the powerful in Europe and the USA”.

    Parliamentary leader of the Republicans, Christian Jacob, pointed out earlier that “Emmanuel Macron has crashed into a brick wall of reality. His hold on national politics is waning, as is his influence. He’s losing control of his government”.

    For the French, the financial markets have too much power and control over France, even more than the government, and many view their president as a representative of the cabal.

    In yet another revealing Ifop survey for Ouest France, 54 percent said they believe that the financial markets hold power over the country. Only 49 percent thought either the President of the Republic or his government did. (Two different answers could be given to this question.)

    According to voters, the French multinationals have as much power as the government, while the media (13 percent), and citizens and voters (8 percent) had very little influence.

    For 78 percent of respondents, these same financial markets have too much power just like the multinationals (74 percent). Even if they consider that the media has little power, 52 percent of the French think that they still have too much influence. Finally, a huge 85 percent estimate that voters and citizens, “do not have enough power”.

    Finally, the French believe that Charles de Gaulle is the president who best embodies power (46 percent of respondents), ahead of François Mitterand (20 percent), Jacques Chirac (10 percent), Nicolas Sarkozy (9 percent), Emmanuel Macron (6 percent) and finally François Hollande (1 percent). “The French consider that at the time, a president that had a meaning, power.

    “Today they [the French] doubt, they wonder if politics has not become a shadowy theater,” Barbier noted on BFM TV.

    “France and power”, an Ifop survey for Ouest France conducted among 1006 people, interviewed on 16 and 17 October.

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