Skip to Content

Migrants picked up at sea. Wikipedia

Numbers of non-deported migrants in Germany keep rising

The number of foreigners in Germany listed for deportation has increased to over 240 000. As of March 31 this year, 241 932 unwanted persons were registered in the Central Register of Foreigners, according to a response by the Federal Government to a request of the AFD-deputy Lars Herrmann.

Published: May 24, 2019, 8:54 am

    Read more

    Berlin

    Since joining the Bundestag in autumn 2017, the AfD has requested this figure every quarter. Accordingly, the increase in the last quarter of 6 000 people was the strongest since the beginning of the query. The number has risen steadily since the end of December 2017 (228 859).

    Of the 241 932 foreigners obliged to leave the country, some 166 464 either lacked papers, had an unexplained identity or had health reasons.

    Most of the exiles come from Afghanistan (19 117) and Iraq (16 944). “The burden on our welfare state and social peace is getting heavier. These people should actually have been deported according to current legislation long ago,” Herrmann told the Berlin weekly Junge Freiheit.

    Instead, the AfD member of the Interior Committee fears that they would remain in Germany due to the recently passed bill known as the Fachkräftezuwanderungsgesetz of the Federal Government. “Breach of law is first made acceptable and then subsequently legalized,” the police chief commented.

    Germany spent a record 23 billion euros last year on helping to “integrate” more than one million asylum seekers and fighting the root causes of migration abroad, Reuters reported. That marks an increase of nearly 11 percent on the 20,8 billion euros that Germany spent in the previous year, a document prepared by the Finance Ministry showed.

    Chancellor Merkel has repeatedly defended her 2015 decision to open German borders to hundreds of thousands of migrants, mainly from Muslim countries, as a “humanitarian necessity”, but has since vowed to prevent a repeat of such mass migration by tackling its causes.

    The government spent a total of 7,9 billion euros in 2018 on measures aimed at keeping migrants outside the European Union and improving living conditions in their home countries – a 16 percent increase compared with 2017.

    Germany’s 16 federal states, which are mainly in charge of funding housing and integrating the arrivals from countries such as Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, received 7,5 billion euros from the government last year, according to the report. This marked an increase of 14 percent.

    Alice Weidel, parliamentary leader of the Alternative for Germany (AfD), criticised Merkel’s government for spending billions on migrants. “This is a costly welcome party at the expense of citizens.”

    But Annette Widmann-Mauz, Minister of State for Migration, Refugees and Integration, called Weidel’s comments “stupid” and in bad taste. “Whoever dismisses humanitarian protection as a party has understood nothing at all,” she added.

    In a new European survey, 41 percent of Germans say they would welcome more asylum seekers despite being the largest recipient of migrants during the height of the migrant crisis, while more than half of Swedes say they do not want to see the country take in more migrants, making it one of the most migration-sceptic nations.

    Some 8 000 people in Germany, Poland, Spain, Hungary, Italy, Belgium, France and Sweden were asked a series of questions in the survey by YouGov, including:

    “Do you agree with the statement: ‘My country should not receive more refugees from conflict areas.’?” to which 51 percent of the Swedish respondents said yes, Spanish newspaper El Pais reported.

    While both Poland and Italy were tied with 53 percent, Swedes were more negative about the prospect than even Hungarians, at 49 percent.

    More than one-third, 35 percent of the respondents across all of the countries surveyed, said that immigration was the most important issue facing the European Union today but only 14 percent said that the European Union had handled the migrant crisis in 2015 and 2016 well.

    [mashshare]

    Keep ​your language polite​. Readers from many different countries visit and contribute to Free West Media and we must therefore obey the rules in​,​ for example​, ​Germany. Illegal content will be deleted.

    If you have been approved to post comments without preview from FWM, you are responsible for violation​s​ of​ any​ law. This means that FWM may be forced to cooperate with authorities in a possible crime investigation.

    If your comments are subject to preview ​by FWM, please be patient. We continually review comments but depending on the time of day it can take up to several hours before your comment is reviewed.

    We reserve the right to del​ete​ comments that are offensive, contain slander or foul language, or are irrelevant to the discussion.

    Europe

    Salvini wants referendum to stop leftist coalition from opening ports

    PontidaAddressing a crowd of 80 000 supporters, Italian League leader, Senator Matteo Salvini called for a referendum on immigration to stop the new government from reopening Italy’s ports to pro-immigration NGOs.

    Heidelberg: Ignorance is the drug of choice

    HeidelbergAnyone who has heard of Heidelberg in Germany, probably thinks of a tranquil little town on the Neckar river, a place full of beautiful sights, a well-preserved historic centre with many tourists and students. But that perfect world has been shattered by the recent case from the district of Emmertsgrund.

    German President launches fresh attack on AfD

    BerlinThe AfD rejected the criticism from Federal President Frank-Walter Steinmeier stating that the Alternative for Germany was not a bourgeois party. "A Federal President should not interfere in the party politics," said the AfD chairman Alexander Gauland.

    The city of Pescara celebrates its soldier-poet Gabriele D’Annunzio

    PescaraFrom September 7 to 15, Pescara, the capital city of Italian Abruzzo region, will celebrate la Festa della Rivoluzione – d’Annunzio torna a Pescara [Revolution festival – d’Annunzio returns to Pescara]. His legacy has inspired Italian sovereignists.

    Betrayal by Bannon

    A story of failures: How Steve Bannon tried to split the Vatican and dragged Matteo Salvini into his misfortune.

    Antwerp: Vlaams Belang leader denounces Islam from rooftops

    Antwerp Flemish Member of Parliament and Antwerp City Councilor Filip Dewinter climbed onto the roof of the Antwerp town hall to highlight the Flemish port city's demography.

    Italy’s new government green-lights NGO landings

    RomeThe new direction of the Italian Conte II Cabinet regarding migrants has been outlined, and it is a different route, if not the opposite, to the one taken in the last 14 months by Matteo Salvini.

    Arctic thaw could see rise in Sino-Russian cooperation

    Climate change and technological advances will soon see the Arctic opening up to new trade routes, and the region's growing economic potential as well as military infrastructure are demanding the attention of global powers.

    Yellow Vests: Renewed mobilization

    For the start of the new academic year, a few thousand Yellow Vests gathered in several major cities in France, marking an increase in mobilization after the summer. Clashes erupted in Montpellier and Rouen in particular.

    The New Dissident Podcast

    Mateusz Piskorski, first political prisoner of Poland, and Manuel Ochsenreiter, editor-in-chief of German ZUERST! newsmagazine will soon be launching their geopolitical podcast – with special guest Prof Alexander Dugin.

    Go to archive