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Climate protesters face stiff opposition

Extinction Rebellion climate protesters in various cities across the globe were met by either counter-protesters or angry citizens.

Published: October 20, 2019, 9:33 am

    The teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg arrived in the capital of Alberta, Canada to spread her doomsday warnings to a crowd of roughly 4 000 supporters on the legislature grounds.

    Thunberg arrived an hour late, while her supporters amassed a few blocks away at Beaver Hills Park, Edmonton, to carefully choreograph their appearance, according to a reporter from Rebel Media.

    There were “two idling diesel buses used to transport climate cultists the three hours from Calgary”, said the reporter. “And I saw an organizer on a bullhorn shouting ‘all the white people to the back, please’.”

    But the climate activists were met by Albertans from United We Roll to remind Greta that she was not welcome in the oil-producing province with her foreign roadshow.

    “When they charged their iPhones last night, that power came from this plant,” a counter-protester told the Daily Mail pointing to a natural gas plant nearby. “Albertans and Canadians are practical people,” he added. “They like real world solutions. Calling for the end of the modern industrial economy, advocating to put millions of people out of work… is not a real world solution.”

    And in San Francisco, on Wednesday morning on Gates Avenue near the University of San Francisco campus, climate protesters had their banner taken down by an irritated citizen.

    When climate activists tried to raid a burger joint and harass the workers, neither the employees nor police were happy about it. “People are fed up with Extinction Rebellion,” says reporter Ian Miles Cheong.

    In London, angry British commuters dragged Extinction Rebellion activists off the top of a busy Tube train in response to their protests aimed at creating traffic chaos.

    At Canning Town’s Jubilee Line platform, two Extinction Rebellion activists held up a banner which read “Business as usual = death” while standing on top of the London Underground train while thousands of commuters were being delayed.

    Commuters then turned on the activists on Thursday morning, dragging them off the top of the Tube, with scuffles breaking out. A protester was pulled to the floor by his hair and hat and kicked out of the way. One transport user shouted: “I need to get to work, I have to feed my kids.”

    According to British Transport Police, eight arrests were made related to the climate protest at Canning Town, Stratford and Shadwell stations. But they urged commuters not to “take matters into their own hands”.

    At Shadwell station, climate protesters had glued themselves to the side of a train.

    A climate protester at Gatwick Airport admitted that things were not going their way: “Obviously it went wrong.” Planned climate action at Gatwick Airport were cancelled after Thursday’s strikes on the London Underground.

    Since last Monday, more than 1 600 people have been arrested after protesters targeted London City Airport, shut down areas around Parliament and the Bank of England, and blockaded Google’s HQ.

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