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Wagyu beef. Stock photo from Pixabay

Kobe beef for Klaus Schwab, cockroaches for the masses

Recently the globalist "elite" gathered once again for a G20 summit, this time on the Indonesian island of Bali. Outrageously expensive, exquisite Wagyu steaks from Kobe beef were on the menu. This Japanese delicacy costs 400 to 600 euros per kilogram (and significantly more for some varieties). Meanwhile, the rest of us are promised insect food.

Published: November 25, 2022, 6:15 am

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    Denpasar

    In their final declaration, the heads of government once again fell over themselves with commitments to climate protection – and according to the ideology propagated by the UN and many media, this also includes the renunciation of meat. In its place, the consumption of insects is promoted.

    As early as 2013, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) published a detailed report on the supposed advantages of insects as a potential new main food source. Due to the “climate crisis”, the production bottlenecks in the global grain supply as a result of wars and the growing population figures, this change in eating habits is said to be becoming more and more topical from the point of view of the UN “sustainability strategists”.

    In particular, bees, termites (like cockroaches, they are members of the superorder Dictyoptera), dragonflies and cicadas would produce “less greenhouse gases and ammonia than cows and pigs” and produce “significantly less land and water than animal husbandry,” according to the new ideology. They could also be used as animal feed in meat production, the UN report claimed.

    As a result of the ever-increasing climate hysteria, Westerners in particular are being forced to completely change their diet.

    Agnes Kalibata, the UN special envoy for the World Food Summit held in Rome in July 2021, acknowledged that insect food had to be made into something “that is accepted in different cultures and societies”. Overcoming this “cultural barrier” was the most important part of making insect consumption palatable to people.

    Apparently, this news had not reached the G20 summit. There were no termites or cicadas on the menu at the event.

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