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‘Non-Western’ migrants are massively overrepresented in Denmark’s benefits system

According to new figures from the Danish Ministry of Employment, some 84 percent of people who receive state benefits are “non-Western origin” migrants.

Published: October 16, 2017, 8:46 am

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    Dependent migrant families in Denmark, consisting of married couples where both partners receive social assistance, receive a third of all cash paid out by the state every month. The latest figures were obtained by Danish daily, Ekstra Bladet.

    The paper reported that experts expressed concern about a minority group receiving such a significant part of the claims, and they admitted that it was a “large and especially expensive problem”.

    These figures are especially high, since non-Western migrants make up only eight percent of Denmark’s working age population. It is estimated Denmark’s migrants cost the government a massive 11 billion Crowns per year in a country of over just five and a half million people, Breitbart reported.

    But a study conducted by Denmark’s Ministry of Finance concluded that in 2014, immigrants and their descendants cost Danish taxpayers at net loss of 28 billion Crowns per year, according to the National Economics Editorial (NEE).

    NEE data “showed conclusively that immigration has been an economic disaster for Denmark” the report stated.

    A Danish job centre chief Eskild Dahl, remarked at the end of his employment at the centre that he had spent “an awful lot of money to virtually no effect” to get migrants to work. It seems as if work is not a priority among non-Western migrants in Denmark, Ekstra Bladet suggested.

    Dahl said migrants regarded government benefits as a right, and the so-called “refugees” generally thought of work as “punishment” to be avoided at all costs. As the Danish welfare state was built on a Protestant work ethic, it was incompatible with the attitudes of the new arrivals, he told the Berlingske.

    More than 36 000 Muslim asylum seekers poured into Denmark in just two years, and these new migrants are a drain on Denmark’s social-welfare system while failing to adapt to its customs.

    The country received its first immigrants in 1967, when “guest workers” were invited from Turkey, Pakistan and what was then Yugoslavia, but not in large numbers. Its people remain overwhelmingly native born, though the percentage has dropped to 88 today from 97 in 1980, The New York Times reported.

    The influx has shocked the stable, homogeneous country. The government has backed harsh measures against migrants, but the anti-immigrant Danish People’s Party has grown to the second largest in Parliament, despite this.

    Clearly migrants are an economic drain. In 2014 already, 48 percent of immigrants from non-Western countries ages 16 to 64 were employed, compared with 74 percent of native Danes.

    Critics complain that Muslim newcomers have been slow to learn Danish, but the Immigration Ministry reported in 2016 that 72 percent passed a required language exam. Some 30 percent of new immigrants however live in ethnic enclaves in the nation’s two largest cities, Aarhus and Copenhagen, where they don’t speak Danish.

    The Immigration Ministry has expressed concern over rising “parallel societies” of migrants living in “vicious circles of bad image, social problems and a high rate of unemployment”.

    Anders Buhl-Christensen, a center-right city councilman in Randers, told The New York Times: “Our problem in Denmark is that we’ve been too polite.” He added: “No one dared talk about immigration, because they were afraid they’d be called racist.”

    Denmark also spends inordinate amounts of money on crime committed by migrants, where 8 of the 9 ethnic groups most represented in Danish prisons are specifically Islamic immigrants.

    The amount of money spent on migrants in 2014 already would be roughly equivalent to America’s federal government spending $2.1 trillion per year on immigrants—a number so large it defies all logic and reason, The Daily Wire noted.

    Some 40 percent of patients in Denmark’s largest mental health hospital have immigrant backgrounds. Thus in terms of population, Muslim immigrants to Denmark are over-represented in mental health facilities by 1 300 percent.

    Denmark placed ads in Arabic-language newspapers  in 2015 essentially suggesting: Don’t come here.

     

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    • JackKrak

      But…but….think of the restaurants!

    • jbwilson24

      Welcome to multiculturalism. You took them in, and now you can’t get them out. And by the way, they have 5 kids per woman, and they can have multiple women. Say goodbye to your country.

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