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Central Government Office, Tokyo, Japan. Flikr

Japanese Ministry of Health warns of ‘serious side effects’ from vaccines

Experts convened by the Japanese Ministry of Health on December 4 recommended affixing the words "serious side effects" to anti-Covid vaccines.

Published: December 7, 2021, 8:34 am

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    Tokyo

    After having listed heart problems in the follow-up of a million jabbed Japanese, a group of experts brought together by the Ministry of Health insisted on adding the mention “serious side effects” on the documents attached to the anti-Covid vaccines.

    The Japanese Ministry of Health has listed myocarditis and pericarditis – inflammations of the heart muscle and the outer wall of the heart – in young men as possible serious side effects of the Covid Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, NHK reported on December 4.

    As of November 14, out of one million men who received the Moderna vaccine, such side effects were reported in more than 81 adolescent men and 48 men in their twenties.

    Those numbers were 15 and 13, respectively, for those who had received the Pfizer vaccine. The ministry, which convened a group of experts on December 4 on the issue, proposed to warn of the risk by printing the words “serious side effects” on documents attached to vaccines.

    It will also require hospitals to report in detail incidents involving people who developed symptoms within 28 days of their vaccination, according to the law. The plan has been approved by the expert panel and the ministry will notify municipalities of this new measure.

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