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Generation Identity: France’s anti-migrant youth group. Screenshot from YouTube
Paris

‘Identitarians are patriots who defend their country in a very hostile environment’

On a daily news analysis programme of the French television channel CNews, commentator Eric Zemmour described the Identitarian movement as a heroic patriotic group. "The Identitarians are patriots who defend their country valiantly and in a very hostile environment." FWM provides some background on the raging debates in the country.

Published: November 21, 2020, 8:56 am

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    On Face à l’info Zemmour challenged Jean-Christophe Cambadélis. Cambadélis is a French politician who was First Secretary of the French Socialist Party (PS) from April 2014 till June 2017. After the huge defeat of the Socialist Party in the presidential and legislative elections of 2017, he lost his mandate as deputy, and resigned as head of the PS.

    According to Zemmour, France “needs a referendum on immigration policy” because “it is no longer France that decides who will come to France, it is the immigrants themselves who decide if they want to come”.

    Cambadélis repeated tired old globalist clichés, which Zemmour deftly deconstructed as empty slogans. When Cambadélis argued that immigrants understandably disliked secularism, Zemmour pointed out that “it is not secularism that they [the immigrants] don’t recognize, it’s France!”

    “There is this alliance between the Sharia and the drug bosses who rule more and more enclaves,” Zemmour pointed out.

    Entangled in the increasingly acrimonious debates on immigration, the Parisian left have continued to refuse the regional charter on secularism developed by Valérie Pécresse, the President of the Regional Council of Île-de-France.

    For the 26th time since March 2017, the group Front de gauche in the Regional Council of Ile-de-France has tabled an amendment to abandon the local charter on secularism, voted in March 2017 by the regional executive.

    This ritual amendment tabled by the leftists seeks to replace the “regional charter of the values of the Republic and secularism” by a statement of principle: “The beneficiary undertakes to read and respect the law of 1905.”

    This local charter, which calls on all beneficiaries of grants from the Île-de-France region to ensure “respect for the values of the Republic and the principle of secularism”, is hated by the left.

    Environmentalists surprisingly also voted as a whole in favor of the outright removal of this clause, French magazine Le Point reported.

    The rector of the mosque of Bordeaux, Tarek Oubrou, estimated on public broadcaster FranceInfo that it would be very difficult to “label” future imams, something that the future body of the national council of imams would like to accomplish.

    “It will be very difficult on the ground to label imams. The imams are not halal products which should be labeled,” said Oubrou. The French Council of Muslim Worship (CFCM) must decide for itself, according to Oubrou.

    Tarek Oubrou considered any charter on republican principles unnecessary, “since the values of the Republic are binding on all religions without distinction, on all citizens, so we do not need to say what is obvious,” he said angrily. The problem of radicalization “is not in the language, or in the fact of being a foreigner”.

    For those imams who have been inciting violence against France continuously, the left-leaning French judicial system has been a great help.

    In Nice, only 23 percent of illegal immigrants held in the detention center were returned to their countries, while 46 percent were released by judges

    Patrick Stefanini, former prefect close to François Fillon and senior official specializing in immigration, has published a book recently on the subject in which he revealed the infernal pace at which the migratory phenomenon continued in France.

    On Tuesday, November 17, a giant migrant camp was dismantled in Saint-Denis, in Seine-Saint-Denis. Over 3 000 immigrants lived there in unsanitary conditions.

    The Minister of the Interior admitted that these often clandestine foreigners, many of them dispersed in the streets of Paris, according to about thirty associations, including Secours Catholique, have been mostly tolerated by the gendarmes and police.

    France clearly no longer has any control over its immigration and voters are becoming angry. A survey carried out by Le Figaro on the subject, was quite informative. Some 78 percent of the French said they were in favor of strictly selecting immigrants. They no longer see immigration as an opportunity for France (63 percent), and wish to return to the law of sanguinity (58 percent) and 55 percent even want to abolish family reunification. In short, they want to make it more difficult to obtain French nationality.

    This sentiment was echoed in the book by Patrick Stefanini, entitled Immigration (Robert Laffont). According to this senior official, France’s extraordinary birth rate (1,88 children per woman) compared to its European neighbors (around 1), and the lack of economic development means that current immigration is totally useless to France.

    Counting the last three generations of immigrants, Stefanini asserted that nearly 30 percent of the French population is of immigrant origin. His statistics are backed by OECD figures. This immigration is sometimes chosen (student, professional immigration) or imposed (family immigration, humanitarian), but in all cases it has been the “number one factor in French population growth since 2016”, replacing the natural evolution of births of ethnic French people, as Stefanini pointed out in his book.

    The author noted that the first waves of migration dated from the beginning of the 20th century. It was from 1921 to 1932, but this immigration, very often Polish and Italian, left quite quickly. In 1946, the percentage of migrants had dropped back to below 6 percent of the total French population.

    “Today, unaccompanied minors are piloted by networks of smugglers, who serve as suction pumps for their families,” Stefanini said in an interview with La Matinale. “The transfers of funds from migrants to their country of origin are bigger than the state aid paid to these countries.”

    According to him: “We tried to justify immigration by the fact that the French did not want these jobs. This theory falls apart because the proportion of unemployed is higher among immigrants.”

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    • LuciusAnnaeusSeneca

      Excellent article. Just a few thoughts. First, popular sentiment against what is happening in France–uncontrolled immigration, social and economic problems, and a political system and players within it that continue to offer no relief to the French public–is widespread, and in some cases runs deep. But it remains in most cases unfocused, and thus can be manipulated by the Macron government on certain issues; one is championing French republicanism versus Islamic separatism among the Muslims resident in the country. Another is French intervention in the eastern Mediterranean on behalf of Greece and other countries there that observe international conventions on maritime boundaires and EEZs. But Macron also fears popular sentiment, as his suppression of the Yellow Vests shows. The latter are not just a threat to Macron. It is important for Macron’s backers in Brussels that the French public be as compliant as possible to the European Project and Macron’s execution of it during his presidency. But at the same time, Macron does not want to be perceived as being against French national, patriotic sentiment. Hence, his efforts to use it to his advantage.

      Second, French identity–cultural and political–remains not only strong, but is a factor in the growing concern of Frenchmen to the failure of its government to control immigration and deal with the no-go zones and the parallel society developing within them. These populations and the areas in which they dwell are not French and never have been, and most French are by now of the belief that they never will be. The non-European migrant population is increasingly seen not as any benefit, but as a serious concern for the country’s future political and social stability, and economic well-being. Increased French national and patriotic sentiment that represents pushback to this is widespread and broad-based. The identarians that are discussed in this article are part of this phenonmenon, and efforts by the leftist-globalists to dismiss or demonize them, and other French nationalist movements, will continue to be of limited success, as the EU’s mass migration and open borders agenda continues to generate problems for Europe and its peoples.

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